Posts Tagged ‘diy’

Simple & Quick Easter Outfits

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Time hasn’t been a luxury for me lately, but I wanted to take time out to do something this Easter for the girls. It’s a tradition my mom held with us when we were kids to make Easter dresses. I love that tradition. I’m sure at some point, Pen & Junie will dread it, but for now they just lit up when I showed them their new skirts. 

I didn’t go sophisticated with their outfits at all. I just made two simple circle skirts and called it good. Junie is in the middle of a growth spurt, so I made her skirt fairly long so she can grow into it. Need some pointers? Check out this tutorial.

Making a woven circle skirt is quite easy. You just have to make sure that you’ve cut the opening wide enough for the hips to fit through and then you put the elastic in the waistband and gather it to fit the waist. Finishing the skirt is simple. If you’ve got a rolled hem foot, it’s even easier. 

Add some fun shoes a chambray shirt and I called it a day for these two munchkins. 

Poor Felix didn’t get anything made. But he doesn’t care quite like the girls do. He had plenty of fun playing with the Hot Wheels cars that the Easter Bunny brought. 

OMG aren’t these little Mary Jane Moccs the cutest things ever?!? They went perfectly with Junie’s outfit!!

Outfit Details: 

skirts: handmade

chambray: H&M and Gap

Penelope’s boots: Zara

Junie’s Moccs: Freshly Picked (c/o)

Tutorial: Watercolor Poppies Notebook

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You new here? WELCOME!! Pop over to Instagram and give me a follow or check out my online calligraphy class!

Over the last few weeks, I’ve made about a dozen or so of these notebooks. I’ve made them for neighbors, family, friends and even a couple for myself. I’ve really enjoyed the freeform aspect of painting the covers as I go. I’ve gotten a few requests for the step-by-step, so here you go!

The cover material is Canson Watercolor Artboard. I was given a pad of this artboard and truly have enjoyed the thickness of this paper. It’s actually coldpress watercolor paper that’s mounted on museum board. So you can soak the paper with as much soupy water as you want, it won’t buckle. You may get a slight bow to the board, but it all goes back to its original flat shape once the paint has dried. It’s perfect for book covers!

Shall we make a notebook (or 10) together? Let’s get it going! Affiliate links are used to link to actual materials I own and use. Your support feeds my craft addiction, which feeds more tutorials. So thank you!! 

For supplies, you will need: 

If you’d like to just paint poppies, skip to the bottom. If you’d like to bind a notebook, you’ll want to line the underside of the boards with a decorative paper. You can use wrapping paper (I used Rifle Paper Co wrapping paper) or any kind of scrapbooking paper you choose. 

You can get your favorite paper and cut it into fourths (4.25″x5.5″), or you can download my lined filler paper and have it printed at your nearest print shop. for a .75″ coil bind, you’ll want at least 60 sheets of paper (15 copies, cut in fourths). If you don’t have a good cutter at home, your local print shop can do the cutting for you! 

First, we need to cut down the boards down to size. For a notebook that fills quarter sheets (see here for filler paper download), 4.25″x5.5″, you’ll cut your boards down to 4.5″ x 5.75″. 

On a larger sheet of decorative paper, apply glue to the backside of the paper. Spread with a watered brush. Press the paper down, be careful to avoid getting glue on the top of your watercolor board or you will have a terrible time painting it. 

Turn the boards over and with your bone folder, work the bubbles out. 

On a protected surface, cut the boards free of the excess paper with a craft knife. I LOVE this craft knife from Slice. It won’t cut skin! See my review of it here.

Allow to rest so the glue has time to dry. NOW on to the painting!! 

For this portion, I’m using 2 different brushes. I’m using a red sable brush (a soft, natural bristle brush), size 5 round and a synthetic size 0 round for the little details. You can use whatever brushes you have on hand, but I like the flexibility of the sable brush and how it gives me more organic lines. You can get amazing results from just about any brush, but if you’re investing in watercolor, consider purchasing a sable brush. They’re just so fantastic to paint with. 

Start by mixing 2 types of oranges. A true orange and a reddish orange. Make them soupy. You want lots of water in there to work with. 

Start by picking up the lighter orange and fill your brush with that pigment. On the middle to top third of the board, I make organic ‘V’ strokes. Start heavy and thick at the top and release pressure so you have a point towards the bottom. It doesn’t matter where you put them. Make about 3. Allow the watercolor to dry. 

If you want an open poppy, scribble a couple of ‘v’s and a rounded bottom. Drop the darker, reddish orange in the wet middle of the open poppy. 

Once the first set of marks have dried, add another ‘V’ stroke, align the bottom of the ‘v’ in the same spot as the lighter pigment, but offset the tops of the ‘v’. 

The one on the lower left wasn’t quite dry when I added the darker color, so there isn’t as much of a separation of pigment. That’s totally okay! You can see on the right ‘V’, that there’s more a separation of color. Making them slightly different gives each flower a more organic touch. 

While the bottoms are still a little wet, draw in the stems. I like to create a varied, organic, almost awkward stem. Drop some darker bits of green color in there for some variation. When it comes to mixing the green stems for poppies, I go for a mid-toned, warm green. No jewel-toned greens here, otherwise the orange won’t pop. 

You can leave your painting simple without any leaves and just do the stems, but I love how easy these leaves are. With the tip of your brush, draw little scribbles. Little zig-zags that go into each other for the leaves. I also like including pods, the stems tend to arc downwards and have a cupped ‘c’ shape on either side. You can be quite abstract with those shapes. 

Now that the greenery is done, the poppies are dry enough for the middles. The centers of poppies are black with little bits of yellow pollen. I like getting a muddy blue-ish black to paint the middles. On the open flower, you’ll draw a circular-ish (again, don’t be perfect) shape with black stamens coming out of the black. You can add yellow to the tips. That’s where the pollen lies. For the profile flower, have the stamens coming out between the front ‘V’ shape. 

With your #0 brush, grab a yellower orange and make little lines coming out of the ‘V’ shapes. Make them squiggly and imperfect. Then add fuzz in green to the pods. 

Boom! DONE! So easy, right? I like to add little splatters afterwards. Because it’s fun. 

For the back covers, I used complimentary colors and something simple like just leaves or a splatter pattern. Easy, peasy. 

 I used this tutorial from Ink Struck Studio for the butterfly cover and I learned the roses from Natalie Malan.

Now for the binding part. With your binder tool, punch holes in the covers and filler paper separate. But make sure that the holes are centered. Put the filler paper on the coils, then the front cover, then the back cover (facing the front cover). This will allow the coil edge to be unseen on the inside back cover. Crimp down with your binder tool. 

Now they’re ready to gift! Or keep. I like to hoard the things I’m most proud of making. ;)

This tutorial and accompanying printable is free for personal use. 

Tutorial: Coffee Filter Flowers

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Hello friends! If you’re here from Studio 5, welcome! I hope you take a look around at my printables and tutorials. If you’d like to sign up for one of my local workshops, click here (or the image below). If you’d like to take calligraphy online, check out my offerings here.

On to the tutorial, shall we? 

Many months ago, I made these versatile coffee filter flowers with friends. Elsa brought all the supplies and we made tons. I made enough to decorate Penelope’s birthday party and my Christmas tree. With very little effort. I believe in all, my collection of flowers took 4-5 hours to make. When you batch it with friends, you can make even more! The great thing about these is once they’re made, they last forever and you can use them for just about any occasion. Add some fresh foliage from the yard and you’re good to go! 

Or stick them in a pot with succulents for a little added color. Here’s how you do it: 

Coffee Filter Paper Flowers DIY

First, let’s grab materials to dye the coffee filters. Since you’re not really laundering the flowers, you can dye them with anything. Dye with Rit, watercolor, heck I’m sure you could use food coloring. I like how permanent my results with Rit were. If you want more granulation and variation in the dye, use powdered dye. 

SUPPLIES for DYEING: 

I love using those hospital bed pans. They’re easy to come by and it doesn’t matter if you stain them with your dye. Also, the hotter the water, the faster the dye process. 

Fill the basin about 1-2″ deep, you don’t need it super deep, with the hottest water you can get from the tap. Add dye. If you want a muted color, add about 1 tablespoon of dye. If you want it more saturated, add more! Pull off a section of 20 or so coffee filters. If you want more color variation, use larger chunks of filters in the dye bath. Dip in and pull out. The longer you soak them, the more consistent the color will be from filter to filter. So I like to pull them after soaking for about a minute. Separate filters and place on a towel to try. For quicker dry times, you can put them on your heater vents (if it’s winter), or out in the sun (if it’s summer). 

Now to make the flowers, you need: 

 

Fold your filters in half. Then in half. Then in half. THEN in half again! Cut a round or pointy end. Then halfway down, do it again. These two pieces will be for flower steps 1 and 2.

Cut the second filter the same way. Add feathering if you’d like with multiple cuts on one or all of the pieces. More feathering, more volume it will have. Cut to the center on one side.

Grab the smallest piece and add glue to one side of the slit. Roll it around your wire stem and hold in place. Bring the rest of the petals around and glue securely.

Grab the second largest piece and glue one edge. Hold in place to allow glue to set. You’ll gather and pinch the bottoms of this layer together as you glue to add more fullness to the flower.

See the difference between the steps? It progressively gets more full. IF you want more volume, add even more layers! 

For the last step, complete like the first. Add glue to the center portion of the coffee filter along the slit. Attach to the flower and wrap around. Glue as you go to secure in place. 

Fluff out and add glue drops to the edges for dew drops!

Here’s a video detailing each of the glue steps:

There you go! Enjoy! 

*This tutorial is free for personal use and should not be distributed/republished without my consent. If you would like to use this tutorial for commercial purposes, please email me. Thanks!

Sponsored: Envelope Template Freebie with Tiny Prints

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This post is sponsored by Tiny Prints. They provide excellent quality printing and amazing printing options to make your holiday cards stand out this year.

I love Tiny Prints. They make sending out Christmas cards a no-brainer. The designs are beautiful and already done for me (we used this one for ours). It’s wonderful to be able to simplify another thing about this time of year without sacrificing tradition. To help you simplify even more, below I’ve included a printable envelope template to help you address your holiday cards quickly. I’ve even included a fun, casual all-caps alphabet exemplar to use with the template.

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Do you have a Silhouette cutter? CLICK HERE to download the .DXF file for the envelope template. You may still want to scroll to the bottom so you can print out the alphabet exemplar as well.

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The family photos were totally chaotic, but Sam Pierson captured the energy and love of our family perfectly. And to be quite honest, I love the screaming photos. June was in the worst mood ever, she didn’t want to have anything to do with our photo session. I was worried that we wouldn’t have any good ones, but candid photos  just get me.

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CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

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Use the envelope template for all-caps work with markers or pens (thicker pens work better, in my opinion), or use it in your regular handwriting! Just write the descenders last, after you take off the template.

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Shop ornaments here.

With the help of Tiny Prints, I’ve gotten grandparent, teacher, bus driver and friend gifts all taken care of. Their custom wrapping paper is beautiful and you can get it in large rolls to wrap bigger gifts.

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Shop gift wrap here.

A huge thanks to Tiny Prints for working with me this year! It’s the third year I’ve partnered with them and I’ve loved every single product I’ve ordered through them. If you have any questions about ordering, just ask!

The freebies in this post are free for personal use only. Alteration or distribution without written consent is prohibited.

SLC Craft & Calligraphy Workshop

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This Thursday (September 15, 2016) I’m holding a craft night at The Write Image! Click here for more info.

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We’re going to be exploring flourished brush calligraphy and we’ll be decorating mugs with our fancy skills. Materials and dinner provided.

REGISTER HERE

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